Humanities 6 Inclusion, Inquiry, Responsibility
Summary: The Humanities curriculum is an integrated English Language Arts and Social Studies approach to grade six reading and writing.  The curriculum focuses primarily on the Eastern Hemisphere as students embark on a yearlong journey to investigate the development of ancient civilizations and contemporary issues faced within these regions.  Students explore primary and secondary source documents as they investigate the developments of government, art, religion, and technology throughout ancient civilizations.  They work collaboratively and independently to conduct research and engage with fictional works of literature.  Students inquire what “makes” a civilization and develop an awareness and understanding of people, cultures, and events, in a variety of places and time periods.
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Unit
Overview
Geography:
Students inquire: How do the tools of geography help us to understand our world?

Students apply the tools of geography to help them understand the world in which they live.  They  use the “Five Themes of Geography” as a framework for inquiry into the Eastern Hemisphere.
The Neolithic Revolution:
Students inquire: Does society change as a consequence of human development, environmental change, or both?

Students investigate the study of early human migration through close reading and analysis.—  They take on the role of archaeologists, and further investigate the changes between the Paleolithic and Neolithic ages through discussion and analysis.
River Valley Civilizations:
Students inquire:
Does geography determine history? How was the development of River Valley Civilizations both similar and different?

In this two-part unit, students study the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia and Ancient Egypt.  They analyze primary sources from both eras and make modern geographical connections to the Middle East and Egypt.  They further analyze the impact of social, political, and economic factors within these civilizations and draw connections to modern times.  Students evaluate the social structures and daily life of ancient peoples by tackling high-level informational texts and engaging in collaborative, investigative projects.
Classical Civilizations:
Students inquire:
How did early civilizations contribute to modern culture? How did military structures of different civilizations impact their success and/or failure as an empire?

In this two-part unit, students study the ancient civilizations of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome.  They analyze primary sources from both eras and make modern geographical connections. They further analyze the impact of social, political, and economic factors within these civilizations and draw connections to modern times.  Students determine perspectives on ancient Greek life by analyzing the teachings of Greek philosophers and the stories and beliefs surrounding the gods.  Students further analyze the development of empires in both civilizations and lasting legacies on the modern world by drawing connections between ancient and modern governments and art.
Assignments & Tasks
  1. ePortfolio assignment: Informational Book: Global Spotlight in the Eastern Hemisphere
  2. Application of the “5 Themes of Geography” framework by researching and analyzing information on a specific region of the Eastern Hemisphere.

 

 

  1. Virtual visit to Catalhoyuk Archaeological Site and Thinglink! creation
  2. ePortfolio assignment: Argumentative Essay
  3. “Was the Neolithic Revolution a turning point in history?”

 

 

  1. ePortfolio assignment: Informational Essay
    1. Choice 1: Compare/contrast the accomplishments of Babylonia and Assyria.
    2. Choice 2: Discuss the development of government in Ancient Mesopotamia. (cause/effect)
               
  2. Literature study: The Epic of Gilgamesh
    Literature Circles
    ePortfolio assignment: Independent Response Questions
  1. ePortfolio assignment: Geography Then and Now
    1. CHOICE 1:  Compare and contrast ancient and modern Egypt in terms of the available resources and the impact of these available resources on the economy and people (how these resources are used), Egypt's current status as a world power, and the significance of the Nile River and its delta.
    2. CHOICE 2:  Compare the geography and resources available to the ancient Egyptians with those we possess in the U.S. Examine how certain geographic features and natural resources could contribute to the making of a superpower and examine the commonalities between other areas of the world where great powers began and have continued to flourish. 
  2. Literature study:The Red Pyramid Literature circles ePortfolio assignment: Independent Response Questions
  3. ePortfolio assignment: Argumentative Essay “Should ancient antiquities be returned to their countries of origin?”

 

 

  1. Voices & Choices Democracy in Ancient Greece program
  2. ePortfolio assignment: Narrative Writing. Students create their own myths based on Greek and/or Roman gods and goddesses.
  3. Literature studies: Blackships Before Troy: The Story of The Iliad
    The Wanderings of Odysseus: The Story of the Odyssey
    1. Literature circles
    2. ePortfolio assignment: Independent Response Questions
         
 
 

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